24th Gene Key – The Creative Painkiller

On the 27th of April, our Sun began shining its light through the lens of the 24th Gene Key and will move into the 2nd Gene Key on the 3rd of May.

When the topic of addictions comes up, it is very common for society to point towards drugs, alcohol, sugar and sex. Yet these are merely the symptoms of addiction, rather than the addiction itself.

Addiction – Invention – Silence

The shadow of the 24th Gene Key holds the secret to understanding where this addictive behaviour is coming from. All 64 Victim patterns of our humanity are essentially addictive thought forms generated in various textures and flavours to achieve one goal. To escape the sensation of suffering and fear.

I carry this 24th Gene Key in my sphere of Core Wound/Vocation in my Gene Keys hologenetic profile. I still remember the early days of my work with the Gene Keys and being stumped by this concept of addiction in my profile.

Throughout my life, I had experimented with many drugs and lifestyle choices, curious and inquisitive about the potentials of human experience. I was a full-time professional bartender and whenever I was not working, I was always out and about socialising which in that profession meant a lot of alcohol!

Yet I didn’t ever feel like I was addicted to the alcohol, but rather it was an environmental part of the world I was living in. I never had the impulse to drink alone and did not experience any withdrawals whenever those moments occurred.

As I contemplated this 24th Gene Key over time, I began to understand that although I did not relate to chemical addictions, I had a much deeper addiction! An addiction to over-stimulation!

During that time of bartending in Norway, not only was I running bars, but I would also often have multiple jobs at the same time, while training at a circus school, running my own circus company performing for events/clubs, breathing fire and riding my beloved high-powered motorcycle.

I was a dopamine junkie, chasing a hit wherever I could find it. When life slowed down and I experienced a pause in all the activity, I would become restless and unable to just be present with the silence. Within minutes I would be on my phone and messaging friends to see who was up for catching up. Every part of my day was being filled with activity.

the 1st step was admitting I had a problem

It was only many years on, with the helpful support of the Gene Keys work, that I realised I was running away from a deep fear of the pain that I would feel if I stopped moving. I feared the unknown that lingered in those moments of silence and the dopamine rush I was chasing was a form of pain killer.

When my mind was constantly in motion, it would distract me from the pain.

Dr Gabor Mate, renowned addiction expert, asserts that the cause of addictions is not in our genome, but rather a by-product of childhood trauma, stress and social dislocation that occur in systems of inequality and injustice.

“The opposite of addiction is not sobriety, but connection.” – Dr. Gabor Mate

This shift in understanding addiction inspired me to contemplate more deeply my childhood environment I had grown up in. The 1980’s were very different to the world we live in now. I was the youngest of 3 brothers, with both parents working to make ends meet.

growing up in the 80’s

I would often come home from school and only see my mother for an hour while she was preparing to go to work nightshift at the post office sorting mail into the late hours. My father was working hard during the days and often under stress from the responsibilities to keep our family provided for.

The 3 of us brothers were loved by our parents yet left to entertain each other and given a lot of freedom. They had no idea of the madness that would go on beyond their view, busy with their own responsibilities.

Being the youngest, I learnt early on how to survive through emotional manipulation. I became a master people pleaser. Over time, I sacrificed more and more of who I was at heart to fit in with those around me and avoid conflict.

I would often steal a couple dollars from my mother’s purse (Sorry mum!) and go down to the local shops to by candy. This candy was my secret treasure that became a ritual for hiding away in my room from the pain of our world, reading Stephen King books that would take me away to another world.

The sugar and the horror stories would feed me dopamine, keeping my mind active and distracted from the yelling matches and fights between my older brothers and parents. It became a more regular practice than I would like to admit.

When I turned 17, I was blessed that my parents had managed to get financially stable enough to send me to my motherland, Norway, for a 1-year student exchange program. This began a new addiction.

Once I completed the exchange program, I was constantly moving from place to another, switching jobs regularly after getting bored with the mundane day to day.

I had owned about 25 different vehicles, 30 jobs and multitudes of homes by the age of 23 when I began to suspect something was not quite right and went to see a psych. I received an adult ADHD diagnosis and was put on Dexamphetamines.

The day I received that diagnosis, I found myself alone in the vault of the gold refinery I was working in at the time, surrounded by gold ingots and sobbing my heart out feeling a strange relief. It felt like I finally understood why I was so different.

The medication really did help for the 3 months I was taking it, enabling me to focus into the future and finding meaning in the present moment. That was what lead me to Oslo, Norway, where my bartending and circus performing career began to take off.

The Dex helped me to ironically slow down my inner world and allow more space for creative impulses to be harnessed and acted on. I began intense physical training every day of the week, pushing my body to its limits.

My motorcycle became my therapy. When I felt stressed, I would jump on it and ride so fast my anxieties would have no room to exist in my mind. The feeling of being so close to death, trees whipping past me at a ridiculous rate, the road beneath me becoming a blur… this was my first real experience of the gift of silence.

It was these creative outputs, between fire breathing stilt walking to The Wailers at music festivals, high speed riding and performance bartending that began to open contemplative space in my life to begin the journey of self-awareness.

My early teachers began turning up synchronistically, and I now had the curiosity to explore these new possibilities. I began reinventing myself.

I became addicted to exploring the mystical worlds and the human experience. My excessive consumption of alcohol fell away quickly when I realised it was inhibiting my balance, getting in the way of showing off and entertaining while out partying!

I had finally found healthy addictions, that fed my soul rather than pull it apart.

My life travels changed from being a form of escapism from pain, to instead being a creative outlet for exploring and creating a new me. Every experience, every environment, every person I met all contributed towards the palette of colours I could use to paint my life.

Creativity itself became my painkiller, helping me to deal with the old traumas of my earlier years, the feeling of loneliness and disconnection from family and community.

“ADDICTION THINKS IN CIRCLES WHEREAS INVENTION THINKS IN SPIRALS.” – RICHARD RUDD, THE GENE KEYS

Unlike my earlier addictions, this form of painkiller felt inspiring and regenerative. Rather than repeating the same behaviours in a circle, I noticed how the creative expressions would instead run those old patters in spirals. Each spin around the pattern would lead to a new inventive approach.

Even though I would often come back to a familiar point of fear, feeling nothing was changing within me, these cycles of shadow began to get shorter and shorter, the gift frequency of invention sticking around longer and longer.

Simply through being aware of my patterns, and accepting them without judgement, they began to transform.

The real breakthrough in these addictive patterns was when I discovered the Gene Keys work. The Hologenetic profile was a road map to my hero’s journey. I began to feel a new sense of orientation to my higher self and relaxing my identification with the so-called real world and this character called Mark.

The Art of Contemplation was the purest antidote to addiction I had ever come across. The simple act of pausing, making space for my emotional body to be felt deeply in my bones, was like a cauldron for my old beliefs to alchemize into new inventive ways of expressing myself.

The suffering I feared so deeply, became an essential ingredient to my magic making. It was the fuel to my contemplations that generated a spark of inspiration and connected me deeper to the world around me and my family more then ever before.

I began to feel peace with the silence. Trusting in emptiness.

I still have my addictions come and go, yet today I do not fear them or judge myself for them. Instead, I become curious and observe the patterns. Feeling it is a puzzle to solve, and the answer can only be found through the silence between the words. Curious about what new invention will birth itself through me.

 I would love to hear your relationship and contemplations around addiction and this 24th Gene Key. Drop a comment below if you feel inspired to share.

Yours sincerely,

Mark Bentley

Subscribe to my newsletter

Links to Support Your Journey

24th Gene Key – The Creative Painkiller

On the 27th of April, our Sun began shining its light through the lens of the 24th Gene Key and will move into the 2nd Gene Key on the 3rd of May.

When the topic of addictions comes up, it is very common for society to point towards drugs, alcohol, sugar and sex. Yet these are merely the symptoms of addiction, rather than the addiction itself.

Addiction – Invention – Silence

The shadow of the 24th Gene Key holds the secret to understanding where this addictive behaviour is coming from. All 64 Victim patterns of our humanity are essentially addictive thought forms generated in various textures and flavours to achieve one goal. To escape the sensation of suffering and fear.

I carry this 24th Gene Key in my sphere of Core Wound/Vocation in my Gene Keys hologenetic profile. I still remember the early days of my work with the Gene Keys and being stumped by this concept of addiction in my profile.

Throughout my life, I had experimented with many drugs and lifestyle choices, curious and inquisitive about the potentials of human experience. I was a full-time professional bartender and whenever I was not working, I was always out and about socialising which in that profession meant a lot of alcohol!

Yet I didn’t ever feel like I was addicted to the alcohol, but rather it was an environmental part of the world I was living in. I never had the impulse to drink alone and did not experience any withdrawals whenever those moments occurred.

As I contemplated this 24th Gene Key over time, I began to understand that although I did not relate to chemical addictions, I had a much deeper addiction! An addiction to over-stimulation!

During that time of bartending in Norway, not only was I running bars, but I would also often have multiple jobs at the same time, while training at a circus school, running my own circus company performing for events/clubs, breathing fire and riding my beloved high-powered motorcycle.

I was a dopamine junkie, chasing a hit wherever I could find it. When life slowed down and I experienced a pause in all the activity, I would become restless and unable to just be present with the silence. Within minutes I would be on my phone and messaging friends to see who was up for catching up. Every part of my day was being filled with activity.

the 1st step was admitting I had a problem

It was only many years on, with the helpful support of the Gene Keys work, that I realised I was running away from a deep fear of the pain that I would feel if I stopped moving. I feared the unknown that lingered in those moments of silence and the dopamine rush I was chasing was a form of pain killer.

When my mind was constantly in motion, it would distract me from the pain.

Dr Gabor Mate, renowned addiction expert, asserts that the cause of addictions is not in our genome, but rather a by-product of childhood trauma, stress and social dislocation that occur in systems of inequality and injustice.

“The opposite of addiction is not sobriety, but connection.” – Dr. Gabor Mate

This shift in understanding addiction inspired me to contemplate more deeply my childhood environment I had grown up in. The 1980’s were very different to the world we live in now. I was the youngest of 3 brothers, with both parents working to make ends meet.

growing up in the 80’s

I would often come home from school and only see my mother for an hour while she was preparing to go to work nightshift at the post office sorting mail into the late hours. My father was working hard during the days and often under stress from the responsibilities to keep our family provided for.

The 3 of us brothers were loved by our parents yet left to entertain each other and given a lot of freedom. They had no idea of the madness that would go on beyond their view, busy with their own responsibilities.

Being the youngest, I learnt early on how to survive through emotional manipulation. I became a master people pleaser. Over time, I sacrificed more and more of who I was at heart to fit in with those around me and avoid conflict.

I would often steal a couple dollars from my mother’s purse (Sorry mum!) and go down to the local shops to by candy. This candy was my secret treasure that became a ritual for hiding away in my room from the pain of our world, reading Stephen King books that would take me away to another world.

The sugar and the horror stories would feed me dopamine, keeping my mind active and distracted from the yelling matches and fights between my older brothers and parents. It became a more regular practice than I would like to admit.

When I turned 17, I was blessed that my parents had managed to get financially stable enough to send me to my motherland, Norway, for a 1-year student exchange program. This began a new addiction.

Once I completed the exchange program, I was constantly moving from place to another, switching jobs regularly after getting bored with the mundane day to day.

I had owned about 25 different vehicles, 30 jobs and multitudes of homes by the age of 23 when I began to suspect something was not quite right and went to see a psych. I received an adult ADHD diagnosis and was put on Dexamphetamines.

The day I received that diagnosis, I found myself alone in the vault of the gold refinery I was working in at the time, surrounded by gold ingots and sobbing my heart out feeling a strange relief. It felt like I finally understood why I was so different.

The medication really did help for the 3 months I was taking it, enabling me to focus into the future and finding meaning in the present moment. That was what lead me to Oslo, Norway, where my bartending and circus performing career began to take off.

The Dex helped me to ironically slow down my inner world and allow more space for creative impulses to be harnessed and acted on. I began intense physical training every day of the week, pushing my body to its limits.

My motorcycle became my therapy. When I felt stressed, I would jump on it and ride so fast my anxieties would have no room to exist in my mind. The feeling of being so close to death, trees whipping past me at a ridiculous rate, the road beneath me becoming a blur… this was my first real experience of the gift of silence.

It was these creative outputs, between fire breathing stilt walking to The Wailers at music festivals, high speed riding and performance bartending that began to open contemplative space in my life to begin the journey of self-awareness.

My early teachers began turning up synchronistically, and I now had the curiosity to explore these new possibilities. I began reinventing myself.

I became addicted to exploring the mystical worlds and the human experience. My excessive consumption of alcohol fell away quickly when I realised it was inhibiting my balance, getting in the way of showing off and entertaining while out partying!

I had finally found healthy addictions, that fed my soul rather than pull it apart.

My life travels changed from being a form of escapism from pain, to instead being a creative outlet for exploring and creating a new me. Every experience, every environment, every person I met all contributed towards the palette of colours I could use to paint my life.

Creativity itself became my painkiller, helping me to deal with the old traumas of my earlier years, the feeling of loneliness and disconnection from family and community.

“ADDICTION THINKS IN CIRCLES WHEREAS INVENTION THINKS IN SPIRALS.” – RICHARD RUDD, THE GENE KEYS

Unlike my earlier addictions, this form of painkiller felt inspiring and regenerative. Rather than repeating the same behaviours in a circle, I noticed how the creative expressions would instead run those old patters in spirals. Each spin around the pattern would lead to a new inventive approach.

Even though I would often come back to a familiar point of fear, feeling nothing was changing within me, these cycles of shadow began to get shorter and shorter, the gift frequency of invention sticking around longer and longer.

Simply through being aware of my patterns, and accepting them without judgement, they began to transform.

The real breakthrough in these addictive patterns was when I discovered the Gene Keys work. The Hologenetic profile was a road map to my hero’s journey. I began to feel a new sense of orientation to my higher self and relaxing my identification with the so-called real world and this character called Mark.

The Art of Contemplation was the purest antidote to addiction I had ever come across. The simple act of pausing, making space for my emotional body to be felt deeply in my bones, was like a cauldron for my old beliefs to alchemize into new inventive ways of expressing myself.

The suffering I feared so deeply, became an essential ingredient to my magic making. It was the fuel to my contemplations that generated a spark of inspiration and connected me deeper to the world around me and my family more then ever before.

I began to feel peace with the silence. Trusting in emptiness.

I still have my addictions come and go, yet today I do not fear them or judge myself for them. Instead, I become curious and observe the patterns. Feeling it is a puzzle to solve, and the answer can only be found through the silence between the words. Curious about what new invention will birth itself through me.

 I would love to hear your relationship and contemplations around addiction and this 24th Gene Key. Drop a comment below if you feel inspired to share.

Yours sincerely,

Mark Bentley

Subscribe to my newsletter

Links to Support Your Journey

24th Gene Key – The Creative Painkiller

On the 27th of April, our Sun began shining its light through the lens of the 24th Gene Key and will move into the 2nd Gene Key on the 3rd of May.

When the topic of addictions comes up, it is very common for society to point towards drugs, alcohol, sugar and sex. Yet these are merely the symptoms of addiction, rather than the addiction itself.

Addiction – Invention – Silence

The shadow of the 24th Gene Key holds the secret to understanding where this addictive behaviour is coming from. All 64 Victim patterns of our humanity are essentially addictive thought forms generated in various textures and flavours to achieve one goal. To escape the sensation of suffering and fear.

I carry this 24th Gene Key in my sphere of Core Wound/Vocation in my Gene Keys hologenetic profile. I still remember the early days of my work with the Gene Keys and being stumped by this concept of addiction in my profile.

Throughout my life, I had experimented with many drugs and lifestyle choices, curious and inquisitive about the potentials of human experience. I was a full-time professional bartender and whenever I was not working, I was always out and about socialising which in that profession meant a lot of alcohol!

Yet I didn’t ever feel like I was addicted to the alcohol, but rather it was an environmental part of the world I was living in. I never had the impulse to drink alone and did not experience any withdrawals whenever those moments occurred.

As I contemplated this 24th Gene Key over time, I began to understand that although I did not relate to chemical addictions, I had a much deeper addiction! An addiction to over-stimulation!

During that time of bartending in Norway, not only was I running bars, but I would also often have multiple jobs at the same time, while training at a circus school, running my own circus company performing for events/clubs, breathing fire and riding my beloved high-powered motorcycle.

I was a dopamine junkie, chasing a hit wherever I could find it. When life slowed down and I experienced a pause in all the activity, I would become restless and unable to just be present with the silence. Within minutes I would be on my phone and messaging friends to see who was up for catching up. Every part of my day was being filled with activity.

the 1st step was admitting I had a problem

It was only many years on, with the helpful support of the Gene Keys work, that I realised I was running away from a deep fear of the pain that I would feel if I stopped moving. I feared the unknown that lingered in those moments of silence and the dopamine rush I was chasing was a form of pain killer.

When my mind was constantly in motion, it would distract me from the pain.

Dr Gabor Mate, renowned addiction expert, asserts that the cause of addictions is not in our genome, but rather a by-product of childhood trauma, stress and social dislocation that occur in systems of inequality and injustice.

“The opposite of addiction is not sobriety, but connection.” – Dr. Gabor Mate

This shift in understanding addiction inspired me to contemplate more deeply my childhood environment I had grown up in. The 1980’s were very different to the world we live in now. I was the youngest of 3 brothers, with both parents working to make ends meet.

growing up in the 80’s

I would often come home from school and only see my mother for an hour while she was preparing to go to work nightshift at the post office sorting mail into the late hours. My father was working hard during the days and often under stress from the responsibilities to keep our family provided for.

The 3 of us brothers were loved by our parents yet left to entertain each other and given a lot of freedom. They had no idea of the madness that would go on beyond their view, busy with their own responsibilities.

Being the youngest, I learnt early on how to survive through emotional manipulation. I became a master people pleaser. Over time, I sacrificed more and more of who I was at heart to fit in with those around me and avoid conflict.

I would often steal a couple dollars from my mother’s purse (Sorry mum!) and go down to the local shops to by candy. This candy was my secret treasure that became a ritual for hiding away in my room from the pain of our world, reading Stephen King books that would take me away to another world.

The sugar and the horror stories would feed me dopamine, keeping my mind active and distracted from the yelling matches and fights between my older brothers and parents. It became a more regular practice than I would like to admit.

When I turned 17, I was blessed that my parents had managed to get financially stable enough to send me to my motherland, Norway, for a 1-year student exchange program. This began a new addiction.

Once I completed the exchange program, I was constantly moving from place to another, switching jobs regularly after getting bored with the mundane day to day.

I had owned about 25 different vehicles, 30 jobs and multitudes of homes by the age of 23 when I began to suspect something was not quite right and went to see a psych. I received an adult ADHD diagnosis and was put on Dexamphetamines.

The day I received that diagnosis, I found myself alone in the vault of the gold refinery I was working in at the time, surrounded by gold ingots and sobbing my heart out feeling a strange relief. It felt like I finally understood why I was so different.

The medication really did help for the 3 months I was taking it, enabling me to focus into the future and finding meaning in the present moment. That was what lead me to Oslo, Norway, where my bartending and circus performing career began to take off.

The Dex helped me to ironically slow down my inner world and allow more space for creative impulses to be harnessed and acted on. I began intense physical training every day of the week, pushing my body to its limits.

My motorcycle became my therapy. When I felt stressed, I would jump on it and ride so fast my anxieties would have no room to exist in my mind. The feeling of being so close to death, trees whipping past me at a ridiculous rate, the road beneath me becoming a blur… this was my first real experience of the gift of silence.

It was these creative outputs, between fire breathing stilt walking to The Wailers at music festivals, high speed riding and performance bartending that began to open contemplative space in my life to begin the journey of self-awareness.

My early teachers began turning up synchronistically, and I now had the curiosity to explore these new possibilities. I began reinventing myself.

I became addicted to exploring the mystical worlds and the human experience. My excessive consumption of alcohol fell away quickly when I realised it was inhibiting my balance, getting in the way of showing off and entertaining while out partying!

I had finally found healthy addictions, that fed my soul rather than pull it apart.

My life travels changed from being a form of escapism from pain, to instead being a creative outlet for exploring and creating a new me. Every experience, every environment, every person I met all contributed towards the palette of colours I could use to paint my life.

Creativity itself became my painkiller, helping me to deal with the old traumas of my earlier years, the feeling of loneliness and disconnection from family and community.

“ADDICTION THINKS IN CIRCLES WHEREAS INVENTION THINKS IN SPIRALS.” – RICHARD RUDD, THE GENE KEYS

Unlike my earlier addictions, this form of painkiller felt inspiring and regenerative. Rather than repeating the same behaviours in a circle, I noticed how the creative expressions would instead run those old patters in spirals. Each spin around the pattern would lead to a new inventive approach.

Even though I would often come back to a familiar point of fear, feeling nothing was changing within me, these cycles of shadow began to get shorter and shorter, the gift frequency of invention sticking around longer and longer.

Simply through being aware of my patterns, and accepting them without judgement, they began to transform.

The real breakthrough in these addictive patterns was when I discovered the Gene Keys work. The Hologenetic profile was a road map to my hero’s journey. I began to feel a new sense of orientation to my higher self and relaxing my identification with the so-called real world and this character called Mark.

The Art of Contemplation was the purest antidote to addiction I had ever come across. The simple act of pausing, making space for my emotional body to be felt deeply in my bones, was like a cauldron for my old beliefs to alchemize into new inventive ways of expressing myself.

The suffering I feared so deeply, became an essential ingredient to my magic making. It was the fuel to my contemplations that generated a spark of inspiration and connected me deeper to the world around me and my family more then ever before.

I began to feel peace with the silence. Trusting in emptiness.

I still have my addictions come and go, yet today I do not fear them or judge myself for them. Instead, I become curious and observe the patterns. Feeling it is a puzzle to solve, and the answer can only be found through the silence between the words. Curious about what new invention will birth itself through me.

 I would love to hear your relationship and contemplations around addiction and this 24th Gene Key. Drop a comment below if you feel inspired to share.

Yours sincerely,

Mark Bentley

Subscribe to newsletter

Links to Support Your Journey

2 thoughts on “24th Gene Key – The Creative Painkiller

  1. Sarah Murray says:

    What a beautiful journey, Mark! I do not have this gene key in my profile, however I do experience some forms of addiction, and I’ve wondered how to deal with them. Your suggestion of just allowing them to reveal what is underneath by accepting them without judgement is brilliant.

    On another note, I am doing the Activation retreat and have thoroughly enjoyed your presence with Maria and Annabelle! Thank you for all that you are doing to raise human consciousness on this planet! 🙏🏼

  2. Mark Bentley says:

    Ah what sweet words Sarah. Thank you for taking the time to share how this landed with you. The Gene Keys book really is such a beautiful guide book to the human experience, irrelevant of what keys we have in our personal profiles. Thank you for connecting here and stoked you are on the Activation Retreat adventure with us! x

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